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Hello new Sushi Ads

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Back in November 2013, we introduced Sushi on iOS, our first native and full screen ad unit. It was our own version of what native ad should be and feel like on mobile. Since then, we released other ad units: Uramaki, Sashimi and Udon Noodle.

Today, we are pleased to announce a completely revamped Sushi for the Appsfire iOS SDK. This evolution improves the previous one on many aspects: this new Sushi displays vibrant colors, stunning retina assets and ultra fluid animations in an interstitial way. We can’t deliver our secret sauce here, but trust our words, two different apps can’t have the exact same Sushi design.

This all new revamped Sushi is available in our latest iOS [...]Read more

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Today we’re very proud to introduce the latest and greatest version of our Android app. If you’re as eager to get this in your hands as we were to get it out on the market, read no further and go download it now from the Google Play Store.

To our Android fans and those on Android who love apps, this update has been long overdue. We delivered a major upgrade to Appsfire for iPhone/iPad this past autumn to rave reviews, and since then we’ve helped millions of app lovers on iOS to discover great apps and great deals. It took us awhile to bring the Android app up-to-speed, but we think you’re going [...]Read more

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This post is fairly technical in nature, but also fairly accessible.

Inter-app communication is still in its infancy. Indeed, as powerful software publishers would have it, each app or each suite of apps would attempt to lock users into a unique file format to achieve a sort of monopole. This is clearly what Microsoft was doing in the 90s with MS Office. Since then, the strong competitive and market forces got the best of the crypted files – Microsoft eventually gave way and started allowing a “clear” version of their files (.docx, .xlsx, .pptx), and even published the specifications of their native files (see the Microsoft Open Specification Promise).

Opening up the file format helped other vendors create alternative office suites, perhaps with competing formats, but almost always with a way to interchange files via an export menu [...]Read more